Glossy Black-Cockatoo Conservancy

 Glossy Black-Cockatoo Birding Day
Tweed Bird Observers have been working with the Tweed Shire Council to bring the Glossy Black-Cockatoo Birding Day to Tweed Shire, annually since 2010. 
Glossy Black-Cockatoo, Calyptorhynchus lathami, is one of the more threatened species of cockatoo in Australia and is listed as Vulnerable under New South Wales and Queensland legislation. With the assistance of volunteers, the Glossy Black-Cockatoo Birding Day will enable researchers to build a picture of the numbers, distribution and social structure of the birds.
Your participation is invited …   
  •  You may give as little or as much time on the day (dawn to dusk). Simply record the time of your bird watching efforts along with your results.  
  • A non-compulsory workshop will be held by Tweed Shire Council  to inform volunteers about Glossy Black-Cockatoo identification, survey procedures, and identification of feed trees. 
  • Select an area you are interested in surveying from the attached list of locations where birds have been seen historically.  A pdf map can also be provided showing sighting locations throughout the Tweed. 
  • Alternatively you may elect to survey your own property if you have Glossies or their feed trees.  If you know of an area used by Glossies not on the list please help us add it to the list. 
  • We can also help you team up with fellow surveyors on the day. 
  • Reply to Tanya Fountain of the TSC direct (see below email) or contact Linda Brannian at Tweed Bird Observers to be added to the volunteer database, and to receive pre-survey information, survey data forms and a detailed map of your chosen survey location.

Please call me if you have any questions or reply to this email with your interest.  I also thank those who have already expressed interest or are repeat surveyors.

Regards,
Linda Brannian
Tweed Bird Observers
0409 833 888

Glossy Black-Cockatoo Birding Day, October 13, 2012

Whilst we had a beautiful day for the birding day – no Glossies were recorded in the Tweed. Sighting a rare bird that is highly mobile becomes as much a matter of luck – even though we target our effort in known habitat sites. They are a pretty elusive species!

 We were a bit down on volunteers this year and most volunteers surveyed on the coast which was a lot drier than in past years. The absence of water in coastal drinking sites may have been a factor. Many of the Black She-oak sites whilst having a lot of cones on trees had little feeding evidence. As trees hold cones in the tree canopy, maybe the cones were more so from last year and therefore not suitable for eating. For the Tweed we had 27 volunteers searching for Glossies in 35 1km2 grid cells. Feeding evidence was recorded in only 3 of these sites on Forest Oak at Koala Beach and Black She-oak at Pottsville Wetlands and Cudgen Nature Reserve.

 Surveyors on the day will be entered into the prize draw which will drawn early in the new year. The Conservancy are still awaiting volunteer lists and data from the regional coordinators before prizes can be drawn, with first prize being a weekend or weekday retreat at Mount Barney Lodge. Once the results for the whole survey area are compiled by Guy Castley from Griffith University, I will let you know the results.  From feedback from other regional coordinators it appears that throughout the region both volunteer and bird numbers were down compared to last year’s survey.

 Thank you all very much for participating in the Glossy-black Cockatoo birding day. We appreciate the support of TBO and hope you will join me again in the next Glossy Black Cockatoo birding day to be held in May 2013 – date yet to be confirmed.

(Tanya Fountain, Natural Resource Unit, Tweed Shire Council)

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s